What’s Affecting Your Arteries?

dWDa9cQ - What's Affecting Your Arteries?

A person’s arteries deliver oxygenated blood throughout the body. The largest artery in the body is the aorta, which branches from the left ventricle of the heart. Arteries are subject to various health conditions, some of which are serious. The following article will explain some of these conditions and how they can affect your arteries.

One of the most common diseases affecting arteries is atherosclerosis, which is caused by plaque buildup on the arterial walls. Plaque makes arteries narrower, which makes it harder for blood to pass. Over time, these plaques can move into smaller blood vessels and form clots. Ultimately, these blockages rob the body of oxygen and nutrients. The risk of heart attacks increases when this condition is left untreated. A high-fat diet can also contribute to hardening of the arteries.

Arteries are made up of three layers, which can vary in size. The largest is the aorta, and the smallest is called an arteriole. The innermost layer of an artery is made up of elastic fibers and connective tissue, while the middle layer consists primarily of smooth muscle tissue. The outermost layer is composed of collagen and elastin, which allows the artery to expand and contract.

In addition to transporting oxygen-rich blood to cells, arteries also carry blood away from the heart. Blood in arteries helps keep cells and organs alive by delivering nutrients and hormones to the body’s tissues. The extracellular fluid that arteries carry from the heart to the lungs is called pulmonary blood.

Arteries are essential to a healthy cardiovascular system and healthy lifestyle. When one or more of these arteries becomes clogged, it can block the flow of blood to vital organs. If left untreated, arterial disease can lead to heart attacks, strokes, and even death. Fortunately, there are ways to prevent arterial disease by reducing the risk factors and living an active, healthy lifestyle.

The aorta is a large artery that originates from the left ventricle of the heart. It passes below the knee and divides into smaller arteries called popliteal and posterior tibial arteries. These arteries provide blood to the thigh, ankle, and foot regions.

When an artery becomes blocked, a fatty deposit builds up on the walls. This buildup causes the artery walls to become narrow and hard. Medication can dissolve the clot and restore the blood flow. A person may need to take medication to prevent clots from occurring in the future. If the artery becomes blocked, the patient may need to undergo surgery.

Arteries have high blood pressure compared to other parts of the circulatory system. Healthy arterial pressure is below 100 mmHg (13 kPa), but high blood pressure can cause arterial damage. During rest, blood pressure in the arteries should be kept below 13 kPa (13 mmHg).

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